Das Finanzsystem als organisierte Verantwortungslosigkeit Amerikanische – Hintergründe der internationalen Finanzkrise

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Ein Essay über die Hintergründe der Finanzkrise von der freien Journalistin Dr. Sabine Grund.

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A Chinese Becomes Deputy Head of the IMF

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by Michael Liebig

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is certainly one of the most influential international institutions. It does matter a lot when the head of the IMF addresses the debt crisis in the United States by demanding that “bold fiscal action” be taken “immediately” to avert “an adverse fiscal shock” with international ramifications.

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Money Alone Won’t Solve the Greek Crisis

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By Michael Liebig

In early May, a poll conducted for the magazine stern showed that 43% of the Germans polled oppose German financial aid to Greece, while 51% find it acceptable. On May 26, the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung titled an article on the same subject “Swelling Disgruntlement”. However, the disgruntlement is the German population has

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Some Thoughts on the “DSK Affair”

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By Michael Liebig

All in all, Bill Clinton was a good American President. Yet, in 1998 President Clinton was almost impeached because he had an extramarital affair with a young woman, Monica Lewinsky, and had initially lied about it. All in all, Dominque Strauss-Kahn was a good, maybe a very good Managing Director of the

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QE 2.0 and the Emerging Multipolar World Monetary System

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When, in a few years from now, political analysts will look back on November 2010, they will likely see it as the moment when the debate over a new multipolar world monetary system became really serious. On Nov. 2, President Obama and Democratic Party suffered severe losses in the US mid-term elections – mainly due to the protracted economic malaise in America. On Nov. 3, the Federal Reserve decided to buy US treasury bonds (and state and municipal bonds) worth $600 billion (a lot more will likely follow). The international answer was unprecedented – in the negative. Then, on Nov. 8, Robert Zoellick, the head of the World Bank and a key figure of the US establishment, suddenly proposed the creation of a “new monetary system”.

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Greece 2011 & Turkey 2001: The Tale of Two Crises

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By Michael Liebig

 

In seems almost certain that Greece will get a 50%+ debt cut sometime in 2012, if not earlier. The “haircut” will be painful for the holders of Greek state bonds – in Greece and abroad. But the EU governments, the European Central Bank and the IMF will do whatever

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Towards a Global Concert of Powers

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Some Observations on the Annual IISS Meeting

by Michael Liebig

Following the 2007-09 financial-economic crisis, the concept of a multipolar world (and multiple connectivity embedded within it) has gained broad acceptance. The denial of multipolarity became unsustainable when the economies of China, India and Brazil withstood the crisis, which had originated in the USA

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„Der Optimismus hat sich gelohnt“

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Deutschland heute – Bilanz und Ausblick Über viele Jahre hinweg hat Friedhelm Ost in der Bundesregierung und im Bundestag die deutsche Politik mitgestaltet. Und er kennt die deutsche Wirtschaft von innen her. Ost steht also über den Aufgeregtheiten der Tagespolitik. Wie sieht er die gegenwärtige Lage der Bundesrepublik? Lesen Sie dazu den politischen Jahresüberblick, den Ost am 22. August 2010 vor dem Bonner “Mid Atlantic Club” (MAC) vortrug. Von Dr. Friedhelm Ost

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Is There a Way Out of the Monetary and Fiscal Cul-de-Sac?

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The background to this year’s central bankers‘ gathering in Jackson Hole is a grim reality: Policies of unprecedented fiscal and monetary super-stimulus have not uplifted the real economy. Instead, they undermine and put in question sovereign credit. Is it conceivable that a “Hamiltonian reflex” will emerge in the USA? Can fiscal and monetary consolidation converge with a productive alignment towards the economic dynamic in Asia and Latin America?

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All Quiet on the European Front?

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In May and June, many mainstream media and “experts” were telling you that Europe was facing imminent disaster: A chain reaction of state bankruptcies in Southern Europe would blow apart the euro currency system and throw the euro zone, if not the whole continent into an economic depression. Merely two months later, the situation looks rather different.

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